This is an attempt to make clear linguistically the essentials of meaning as extensively as possible. The following are several of the main points in this paper.
1) We can define the meaning of a word as 'a concept which is the reflection of the totality of qualities common to all that can be expressed by the word'.
2) For a given phonological shape not to be homonymous, it is necessary that there be some qualities such that all that can be expressed by it possess them and nothing else possesses all of them.
3) To describe the meaning of a word is to describe the qualities common to all that can be expressed by the word.
4) So-called 'semantic relations between words' are not intra-linguistic ones.
5) The meaning of a word is not divided into smaller linguistic units of any sort.
6) Types of connection between two linguistic forms or between a linguistic form and a string of linguistic forms can also be considered to have meanings.
7) The meaning of a sentence or of a phrase can be considered to have two forms; an analyzed one and a synthesized one.
8) So-called 'deep structure' does not exist linguistically.